Incredible lighthouses to visit around Australia

Fancy a break from the daily grind? These lighthouse getaways and day trips will get you back to nature.

Being a big, old island nation, there are no shortage of lighthouses in Australia, strung along our shorelines nationwide.

The historic structures - many dating back to the 1800s - are impressive in themselves, but now they are better known for attracting tourists than guiding ships to shore. (Or for appearing in cult 90s TV shows. Yes, we're talking about the Round the Twist lighthouse!)

If you're longing to get off the grid, stay in a lighthouse keeper's headquarters, or just drop by to gander at the horizon and ponder life at these beautiful locations.

Point Hicks Lighthouse, VIC

If you want to remove yourself from civilisation for a weekend, Point Hicks lighthouse in the Gippsland region will tick your boxes. No phone, internet or television exists on the site, so you'll pretty much be alone with nature and your thoughts. The self-contained lighthouse keeper's cottages and bungalow can actually accommodate up to 20 people if you want to go all out for your next big event! Rates start from $120 a night for the bungalow, and $360 for a cottage.

 

Montague Island Lighthouse, NSW

There are two types of cottages at the breathtaking lighthouse grounds on Montague Island on the NSW south coast, fitting from five to 12 people. Due to the secluded location, boat transfers from the mainland are required and will be included in your accommodation package - just don't forget something at home! While there you can also arrange for snorkelling or diving adventures where you're likely to see a seal or two. The lush greenery on the island and opportunities for wildlife sightings make your stay all the more beautiful.

Image credit: NSW National Parks

Point Lowly Lighthouse, SA

The picturesque lighthouse near Whyalla is described as "a mecca for keen photographers". The historic site is home to two cottages available for guests to hire for holidays through Whyalla Visitor's Centre from $200 a night (minimum two nights) or less if you book online!

Image credit: Getty

Split Point Lighthouse, VIC

It's the lighthouse from Round the Twist! While there isn't any accommodation on site, you can stay nearby in Aireys Inlet and take one of the 30-45 minute guided tours for $14. Let's call it an unmissable Australian a pop-culture experience with a great view to boot. 

Image credit: Getty

Sugarloaf Point Lighthouse, NSW

Located in Myall Lakes National Park in Seal Rocks, the Sugarloaf Point Lighthouse has a few accommodation options for keen tourists. The glorious Headkeeper's Cottage is great for large groups and families, with three queen bedrooms and two single beds. It's completely self contained and great for cook-ups to enjoy with a view of the ocean.

Image credit: AirBnB

Maatsuyker Island Lighthouse, TAS

You can't actually "visit" the lighthouse, per se. The only occupants of Maatsukyer Island are two volunteer caretakers, who are employed from the general public to do grounds maintenance and 'observe the weather'. They live on the island in total isolation for six months with no Internet or TV, with just one replenishment of supplies three months into their stint.

Basically, if you want to visit this lighthouse, you better be willing to spend six months in basic isolation! The sought-after volunteer gig is all booked up until 2019, but will re-open that year for 2020-2022 applications.

 

Hornby Lighthouse, NSW

This Sydney lighthouse is close to the city, making it a fun site for locals and out-of-towners. Located near Watsons Bay along the South Head Heritage Trail, this red and white-striped beauty is destined to become an Instagram sensation sooner or later, so get in quick.

Image credit: Getty

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