Can you spot the difference? How these simple food swaps can impact your health

Here's how small, simple food swaps will make a big difference.

Dietician Paula Norris has shared the simple food swaps that will lower the amount of calories in a meal.

Her clever calorie comparison photos demonstrate exactly how much impact swapping out a few ingredients can have.

Sharing her tips on Instagram to her 112,000 followers, her page is full of calorie comparisons, showing how simple swaps can take meals from 730 calories to 370 calories.

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One of her most popular posts shows how a seeminly healthy salad can go from 900 to 600 calories with a couple of quick changes.

“'I have always been a hungry human. So here's an example of what I do so that I don't go overboard on the calories whilst still getting plenty of food,” she said.

For this food swap, her tips include swapping some of the chicken for black beans and decreasing some of the high calorie ingredients on the plate such as the avocado.

The lower calorie salad also contains less oil, rice and pumpkin seeds.

“On the left, there is 200 grams of chicken breast cooked in two teaspoons of oil, one cup of rice, half a carrot, half a cup of lettuce, one cucumber, six cherry tomatoes, half an avocado and two teaspoons of pumpkin seeds,” she explained.

“On the right, there is just 100 grams of chicken breast cooked in one teaspoon of oil, 100 grams of black beans, 1/2 cup of rice, one carrot, one cup of lettuce, two cucumbers, eight cherry tomatoes, a quarter of an avocado and one teaspoon of pumpkin seeds.”

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

SPOT THE DIFFERENCE ????????? I’ve had a few requests to post the differences from my last post so here you go. ????????? On the left: ??200g chicken breast cooked in 2tsp oil ??1 cup rice ??1/2 carrot ??1/2 cup lettuce ??1 quke ??6 cherry tomatoes ??1/2 avocado ??2 tsp pumpkin seeds ????????? On the right: ??100g chicken breast cooked in 1tsp oil ??100g black beans ??1/2 cup rice ??1 carrot ??1 cup lettuce ??2 qukes ??8 cherry tomatoes ??1/4 avocado ??1 tsp pumpkin seeds ????????? Of course the one on the left is also ok especially if you have higher calorie requirements. ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? #healthytips #wellnessblogger #weightlossjourney #nutritioncoach #allfoodsfit #fuelyourbody #healthychoice #dietitian #eatsmart #calories #weightlossideas #nutritional #smartfood #healthytips #justeatrealfood #eatbetter #caloriecounting #notadiet #healthychanges #weightlosstips #smallchanges #healthydinner #healthydinners #healthymeals #spotthedifference

A post shared by Paula Norris, Dietitian (@movingdietitian) on

Paula continued, “Of course, the one on the left is also okay, especially if you have higher calorie requirements.”

In another example, she explained how the same meal can be transformed from having 683 calories to 438 calories with a few small changes.

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“As you can see, a few small tweaks and you can save calories whilst maintaining protein at a level that will keep you full and increase your micronutrient (vitamin and mineral) intake through more vegetables,” she wrote on the post of a chicken, vegetable and rice meal.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Eating more volume for the same or even less calories is key for satiety. As you can see, a few small tweaks and you can save calories whilst maintaining protein at a level that will keep you full and increase your micronutrient (vitamin and mineral) intake through more vegetables. Here’s how this one was done. ????????? On the left: ??100g chicken breast ??100g zucchini ??100g carrot ?? 50g capsicum ??50g broccoli ??1 tsp extra virgin olive oil ??2 tsp salt reduced soy sauce ??1/2 tsp sriracha chilli sauce ??1tsp lime juice ??1/2 cup cooked basmati rice ?????????????????? On the right: ??200g chicken breast ??50g zucchini ??50g carrot ??25g capsicum ??2 tsp extra virgin olive oil ??2 tsp salt reduced soy sauce ??1/2 tsp sriracha chilli sauce ??2 tsp honey ??1 cup cooked basmati rice ????????? Of course the one on the right is also ok especially if you have higher calorie requirements, although I do think it’s always a good idea to try and avoid added sugars in stir fry sauces if you can. I prefer to have my added sugar in the form of some chocolate! ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? ????????? #spotthedifference #healthytips #wellnessblogger #weightlossjourney #nutritioncoach #allfoodsfit #fuelyourbody #healthychoice #dietitian #eatsmart #calories #weightlossideas #nutritional #smartfood #healthytips #justeatrealfood #eatbetter #caloriecounting #notadiet #healthychanges #weightlosstips #smallchanges #healthydinner #healthydinners #healthymeals

A post shared by Paula Norris, Dietitian (@movingdietitian) on

Her swap tips also apply to snacks, demonstrating that 30g of chocolate has the same calories as 200g strawberries, eight almonds and one block of chocolate.

“I’m not going to lie - I do have the option the left at times. BUT I think we all know how much more nourishing and satisfying the option on the right is,” she said.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Paula Norris, Dietitian (@movingdietitian) on

Images: Moving Dietician Instagram.

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