Colour Psychology

Colour affects your mood, behaviour, sales of a product, purchasing decisions, your immediate atmosphere and stress levels. We like some colours more than others, but aesthetics aside, how do colours actually make you feel?

Brendan looks at three groups of colours by focusing on the mood they create inside your home:

Light


  • To lighten your space, go for colours like blue and green. This is the colour to create instant calm. It relaxes the nervous system and stimulates thought. It suggests freshness and hygiene so is great for a bathroom. The flipside of blue is that it can be perceived as cold and unfriendly, so it's probably not so good for an entrance hall.

Bright


  • Go for reds to brighten things up – red represents danger, passion, excitement, aggression and stimulation. Since it also increases blood pressure it's perhaps a little inflammatory for the dining room, but perfect for the bedroom!.
  • Yellow is the colour of sunlight. Eternally optimistic, it lifts our spirits and encourages creativity. It's always great for the kitchen or hallway. However yellow is also one of the most tiring and aggravating colours, especially for long periods of time. And couples apparently fight more and babies cry more in lemon-coloured rooms.

Balance, calm and contentment
  • Green is nature's own colour and also the most restful. It can, however, be perceived as too bland and slightly nauseating, so it's not the best choice for the dining room.

Night


  • If you want to create a richer, cosier space, go for deep colours. Dark colours are in at the moment – aubergine, dark blues, purples, deep oaks and browns. It's all about richness and warmth, luxury and strong flavours, but remember such colours can also darken and enclose a room.
 
 

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